Curbing fertiliser costs

Fertiliser expenditure is usually the largest outgoing after mortgage payments, which are currently lifting to levels not seen for close on thirty years. Fertiliser costs have already risen dramatically, particularly that of manufactured imported high analysis...

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When local is best

Some years back there was a government backed campaign to buy locally made merchandise.  How effective it was is unknown however there was no way I was going to part with my hard-earned dollars for a New Zealand product unless it was as good as and price competitive...

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Providing magnesium with dolomite from Golden Bay

There’s no ifs and buts, our own health is only as good as the soil from which our food is grown. A carbon rich soil alive with beneficial life will always produce more food of higher quality than that from a low carbon compacted one. Soil is a living breathing...

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Learning from the best

The late Emeritus Professor Tom (T.W.) Walker of Lincoln University wrote in Dolomite, A first class source of magnesium, “it makes good sense to me to correct animal deficiencies through the soil and the plant. If my diet were deficient in protein and carbohydrate, I...

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A little magic from Golden Bay

The cost of imported fertiliser products, particularly those containing soluble phosphorus and potassium have lifted sharply in price in the last six months and there is a strong likelihood they will again be more expensive in autumn. After debt servicing fertiliser...

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The true value of Golden Bay Dolomite

With supply of fertiliser inputs from overseas becoming increasingly expensive and erratic, it’s worth focusing on our own resources. Magnesium is an essential input on virtually all intensive dairy farms and there is no guarantee that magnesium oxide products, all of...

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You can build it, or burn it! June 2017

Soil carbon that is; the very thing we rely on for our survival. Without it there is no plant growth as we know it, and as its being diminished, less nutrient and moisture is available for plant uptake. Any reduction in soil carbon levels, due to it being...

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What you may not already know, Dec 2016

A popular belief at present is that a concerted push to reduce the environmental pressure of intensive pastoral farming will mean less pasture grown, resulting in decreasing total farm production, smaller factories and associated infra-structure, fewer...

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The added value of dolomite this spring September 2016

There’s a school of thought seemingly prevalent among the science and farming communities in NZ that, although changes are required to soil fertility systems in order to stem further environmental damage, they can be made by tweaking the existing urea...

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Reducing Fertiliser-N dependency , April 2016

The collapsed dairy milk price and the downturn in sheepmeat export prices has caused a sudden flurry of promotion for good management of permanent pasture. The advice has emanated from all levels and related organisations, many of which had formerly been...

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